Writings

Most of my published works are out of print, which is not so terrible, because I am not certain if I approve of all of them. Nevertheless, I have converted several to PDF format, and these can be read on-line or downloaded. So, if the title appears in a bold, blue font, click on it, and you will be able to read the article onscreen or download it.

Birthright
A retelling of the Jacob/Esau story, based on a radical hasidic reinterpretation of the well-known biblical narrative. First appeared in Parabola, Vol. IX, no. 3; in: The Inner Journey, Views from the Jewish tradition. Parabola Anthology Series, 2007

Selections from a Commentary on the Haggadah

This is what it says, an incomplete commentary. I shall almost certainly never finish it. First appeared in Conservative Judaism, Vol. XLII, no. 2, and subsequently in several other places.

The Evolution of the Blemished Priest

This article has an interesting history. It was originally commissioned as a paper for a conference on disability. It was much too theological for the Marxist organizers. With the insight of 20 years, I think that I should probably rewrite it; I don’t agree with its conclusions. First appeared in New Traditions, Premier Issue, Spring, 1984; reprinted in several other places.

Fish: a Story

Here I tried my hand at that favorite genre, magical realism. First appeared in New Traditions, Vol. I, no. 3.; reprinted in Dancing on the Edge of the World: Jewish Stories of Faith, Inspiration and Love, ed. Miriyam Glazer, 2000.

The Praying Masters of my Soul, in Parabola, Vol. XI, no. 2. Thank you masters WBH and GMH.

The Needs and Expectations of the Religiously Alienated Jew, in Melton Journal, Summer, 1984;reprinted in The Jewish Newspaper, Los Angeles, Vol. I, no.1; extensively copied and mimeographed. In 1981 I was invited to Los Angeles to work with Jews who had found no spiritual satisfaction within Jewish institutions. This article is based on the first report I made to the Los Angeles Board of Rabbis after a few months of work. It created quite a stir.

The Great Transition in Parabola, Vol.V, no.3; reprinted in Response, nos.41-42; illicitly mimeographed and distributed in tens of thousands of copies by some organization in Minnesota; also published in highly garbled Hebrew translation in Mirkam, 1980; in: The Inner Journey, Views from the Jewish tradition. Parabola Anthology Series, 2007.This is my earliest piece, written when I remained outside, an observer, hesitating, waiting at the approach to the Great Transition.

… and some more:

Modern Manifestations of Jewish Mysticism–Background and Survey, in Immanuel, 1980; also published in different version in Hebrew in Petahim, 1981.

Introduction, in Hebrew, in ???? ??? ??? , an illustrated edition of tale by Nachman of Bratslav, 1980.

The Study of Torah as Awakening, in Parabola, Vol. VIII, no.1.

The Teacher as Role Model, in Melton Journal, Spring, 1982.

She Who Has No Light Of Her Own, in Parabola, Vol. VIII, no. 4.

The Seventh Beggar, an essay in a Symposium on Wholeness, in Parabola, Vol. X. no.1.

Worlds of Prayer: a Festschrift in Honor of Zalman Schechter-Shalomi, 1993. Edited with Shohama Wiener.

Poems, reviews, in various publications, under divers pen names (Jonathan Omer-Man, Derek Orlans, and others).

Interviews in numerous publications, radio and television shows.

Work described at some length in several books, including Kamenetz’ Jew in the Lotus and Stalking Elijah .

Documentary film, Building Bridges, the Religious Work of Jonathan Omer-Man, produced by JewishTelevision Network, Los Angeles, 1983.

Translations: Fishes of the Sea of Japan and the adjacent areas of the Sea of Okhotsk and the Yellow Sea. (Ryby Yaponskogo morya i sopredel?nykh chastei Okhotskogo i Zheltogo morei). / [By] G. U. Lindberg and M. I. Legeza. Translated from Russian and edited by Derek Orlans (Jonathan Omer-Man).

One thought on “Writings

  1. I have read and re-read your post today “Lingering. . .”

    I am pleased to know that what I often do during services is now not so idiosyncratic and weird.

    David

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